Category Archives: Container Gardens

Making Winter Planters

Planter Christmas planter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that there’s snow on the ground, and the pumpkins and fall mums are all put away, my front step is looking awfully barren and boring.  Luckily for me, I have the great opportunity at Lacoste to have our designers make up a winter planter for me to bring home and pop onto the step!  Luckily for you, you can too! We offer both custom and pre-made winter planters that will add colour and flair to your outdoor Christmas decorating.

However, I know that many of you are fantastic diy-ers, and can create your own fantastic arrangements.  If you’ve never tried before, here are some tips from our expert container designers!

The Container

First, consider the planter that you’d like to use.  I typically re-use the same containers that I plant with in the spring.  Re-using is great, because it means that it already has weight in the bottom, AND I don’t have to move anything around!  Just make sure that you empty out the top bit of soil from the planter when you remove your plants, to make room for your greens, and to make sure that the planter doesn’t crack as the soil freezes.

The Greenery

Evergreen branches and boughs typically provide the main structure of a winter planter. Cedar boughs offer soft draping texture, and spruce and pine will create a sense of structure or height.  The different tones of each of these boughs will give texture and depth to your arrangement.  In our arrangements, we try to use a little of each!

In addition to the greenery of coniferous boughs we often add in twigs and large branches to create height in tall containers.  Birch trunks are a local favourite, but red and yellow dogwood, and twisty willow are some other great choices.  Including both in your planter can balance a tall design.

The Bling

My favourite part of every winter planter is the bling and accessories.  This is where you get a chance to express your style and personality! By using similar elements from your interior décor, you can create a sense of cohesion from outside to inside. The options are as endless as there is variety in Christmas décor.  Seed pods, berries and pinecones will enhance the feel of an outdoor Christmas, but it doesn’t need to stop there.  Sparkly twigs, artificial flowers, shiny ornaments, and lights and lanterns all add colour and style too!

The Design

The biggest consideration in creating the arrangement is proportion.  A balanced arrangement is generally two-thirds the size of the container, and widest at the bottom

Begin by outlining the container with evergreens draping over the edge of the container.  Once the outline is complete, fill in the rest of the shape, working in groups of three, five and seven.  Using a variety of lengths and types of evergreens, and branches, fill the container as much as possible

Once your arrangement is well formed, add the embellishments.

 

 

winter planter how to

Creating your own design is easy and it adds a personal touch to your decor. With very little effort you can have a gorgeous container to beautify your garden until spring arrives.

House Plants and Water

So many times when talking, about houseplants, I’m asked “how much water does it need?” or “how often do you need to water it?”

Unfortunately, the easy answer is never the most satisfying, as the easy answer is “it depends”.  It depends on the type of plant.  It depends on the amount of sunlight it receives.  It depends on the temperature of the room. It depends on the size of the plant.

In one of my kids bedrooms, there is two Pothos plants.  Both are in identical 6-inch grey ceramic pots.  Both are the same distance away from their respective windows.  Both are watered on the same day, with approximately the same amount of water.  However, when I went in this week to vacuum and water, this is what I saw:

pothos

To clarify, or complicate matters, the plant on the left is in an east-facing dormer window, the one on the right is in a south-facing dormer window.  The south window is shaded by a large tree, and generally seems darker, and the east-facing window seems to be the sunnier warmer location for the entire day.

Luckily, most of my houseplants benefit more from neglect, than from over-watering, and now both are thriving again. My best suggestion, as un-helpful as it may seem: water your houseplants when it seems like they need it.

To keep things green and healthy in your home, here are some other great options:

 

http://www.daviddomoney.com/2015/01/14/top-10-cant-kill-houseplants-lazy-gardeners/

All About Air Plants

After Gardening Saturday, an Air Plant (Tilandsia), made its way home, and landed on the kitchen counter, and there it stayed. My plan is to gather a few friends for this one, and hang them in glass terrariums that I have been eyeballing for years.  We have a bit of an abusive relationship with houseplants at our house, due to a cat that will eat anything stringy, a toddler that will pull off anything hanging, and two older kids who will make dinosaur jungles around the base of any plant that’s available (we do have several great options that thrive despite their enviroments).  I’m hoping that these Air Plants, hung up high will be safe from everyone!

Air Plants are so named because their roots do not need to be planted in soil; the leaves draw necessary nutrients from the air.  In the wild, they can be found clinging to rocks and trees with their roots.

Air plants need air, water and light to thrive, just as any other house plant. They can live in a container (like my future terrarium!) as long as that container is not sealed, and air can circulate around the plant.

Most plants draw moisture from the soil with their roots; since Tilandsia draws water from the air, it needs to be misted regularly.  Like any other houseplant it is important to consider that a plants hydration needs will vary drastically depending on its environment.  One article recommended bathing the plant once/week in the summer, and once every three weeks in the more humid winter.  Obviously in Manitoba, our dry winters and more humid summers would have us reverse that schedule!  Most Garden Centres recommend misting Tilandsia a few times a week.  Our Air Plant is eagerly misted every day, with reminders from our little gardeners!

Tilandsia likes to be in bright, indirect light.  Placing it in front of a south-facing window would probably not be the best option, but in a bright room without a direct sunbeam will allow it to thrive!

It is possible for Air Plants to bloom, but is tricky (not this tricky ).  They only bloom once in their life cycle, just as they reach maturity.  If you see one that is starting to produce baby plants (“pups”), treat it to a bit of fertilizer in its bath or water mist, and you may be able to see it!

Air Plants are so versatile in their ability to be displayed and grown. At an affordable price, they can be replaced in the same manner as cut flowers, and can also be displayed in a wide variety of ways to suit your own home’s style and personality!

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What to Plant in Sunny Planters

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Last week, I outlined some basic ideas for containers in shady spots.  The same principle of “thriller, spiller, and filler” applies for sunny containers too.

Sun Plants:

Thriller: Plants that add height and a bit of unique appeal.

Dracena (spikes), Ornamental Grass, Canna Lilies, Banana, Gaura, Cleome, Geraniums,                   Kanga Paw

Filler: Mounding plants that won’t reach the height of your thriller, but will fill in around and in front of the thriller.

Geraniums, Angelonia, Annual Daisies, Alternanthera (red threads), Potunias

Spiller: Adds interest and flows out of the pot. Can be either flowers or foliage.

Lobelia, Bacopa, Wave petunias, Million Bells, Silver Falls/Emerald Falls, Creeping Jenny

 

The thriller is usually placed in the middle (if seen from all sides) or towards the back (if front/side views only). Then moving outwards/forwards add the fillers. Then finally along the outside edges add your spillers.

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12″ pot= 5 plants

14″ pot= 7 plants

16″ pot= 9 plants

 

Remember, when you first plant your containers they will look sparse. They will fill in as the plants mature. Try not to over stuff them as it can result in over-crowded and unhealthy plants.